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Optimal Weight FAQ

Optimal Weight FAQ

Q?

What is the medical definition of Obesity?

A.

Obesity is defined as a complex disorder involving an excessive amount of body fat. It has become one of the worst epidemics in the history of the United States.

Q?

How common is it to be an unhealthy weight?

A.

68.6% of American adults are overweight or obese, with more than 3 million new cases per year.34.9% of American adults are obese, and 7.7% are considered morbidly or extremely obese. 25% of young adults who try to join the military are ineligible due to fitness or weight concerns.

Q?

What is the problem with being Overweight or Obese?

A.

Obesity-related conditions include heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes and certain types of cancer, which are some of the leading causes of preventable death in the U.S. Smoking and obesity carry similar risks associated with preventable deaths.

Other problems include trouble sleeping, sleep apnea (a condition in which breathing is irregular and periodically stops during sleep), varicose veins, skin problems caused by moisture that accumulates in the folds of your skin, gallstones, and osteoarthritis in weight-bearing joints, especially the knees.

The estimated annual medical cost of obesity in the U.S. was $190 billion in 2017; the annual medical costs for people who have obesity was $1,429 higher than those of normal weight.

Q?

What is the cause of being Overweight or Obese?

A.

The majority of this problem stems from over-consumption of calories and lack of activity. However, there are also genetic factors, hormonal imbalances, and some medications which make a person more susceptible to becoming obese and create difficulty in losing weight.

Q?

What options available for treating overweight or obese people?

A.

Contrary to what you may see advertised on TV or the internet, there is no magic pill or single diet that is right for everyone. The only way to lose weight is to burn more calories than you consume. If you are overweight, there are simple things you can do which will make a big impact, such as maintaining a healthy diet, keeping within your daily caloric needs, and regular exercise. Exercise is important as it increases metabolism and helps burn calories. Before starting any extreme diet or exercise program, a trained healthcare provider should perform appropriate health assessments in order to evaluate an individual's health status and risks.

There are also major surgical and invasive medical proceduresthat can be performed to assist people suffering from morbid obesity.Gastroplasty, laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding, sleeve gastrectomy,biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch,and full gastric bypass are some of the surgical options.

Q?

Am I Overweight or Obese?

A.

That depends on your weight verses your height, and to a much lesser extent, other factors such as waist circumference, skin fold size, etc. These factors are calculated into a number referred to as your Body Mass Index or BMI. Body Mass Index (BMI) is a person's weight in kilograms divided by the square of height in meters. A high BMI can be an indicator of high body fat.

• If your BMI is less than 18.5, it falls within the underweight range.
• If your BMI is 18.5 to <25, it falls within the normal range.
• If your BMI is 25.0 to <30, it falls within the overweight range.
• If your BMI is 30.0 or higher, it falls within the obese range.

Obesity is frequently subdivided into categories:
• Class 1: BMI of 30 to < 35
• Class 2: BMI of 35 to < 40
• Class 3: BMI of 40 or higher. Class 3 obesity is sometimes categorized as “morbidly,” “extreme,” or “severe” obesity.

At an individual level, BMI can be used as a screening tool but is not diagnostic of the body fat or the health of an individual. A trained healthcare provider should perform appropriate health assessments in order to evaluate an individual's health status and risks.

The BMI table on next page can be used as a quick reference. To use the table, find your height in the left-hand column labeled “Height”. Follow across to identify your weight (in pounds). The number at the top of the column is your BMI based on your height and weight.

 

BMI 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34
Height
(inches)
Body Weight (pounds)
58 91 96 100 105 110 115 119 124 129 134 138 143 148 153 158 162 167
59 94 99 104 109 114 119 124 128 133 138 143 148 153 158 163 168 173
60 97 102 107 112 118 123 128 133 138 143 148 153 158 163 168 174 179
61 100 106 111 116 122 127 132 137 143 148 153 158 164 169 174 180 185
62 104 109 115 120 126 131 136 142 147 153 158 164 169 175 180 186 191
63 107 113 118 124 130 135 141 146 152 158 163 169 175 180 186 191 197
64 110 116 122 128 134 140 145 151 157 163 169 174 180 186 192 197 204
65 114 120 126 132 138 144 150 156 162 168 174 180 186 192 198 204 210
66 118 124 130 136 142 148 155 161 167 173 179 186 192 198 204 210 216
67 121 127 134 140 146 153 159 166 172 178 185 191 198 204 211 217 223
68 125 131 138 144 151 158 164 171 177 184 190 197 203 210 216 223 230
69 128 135 142 149 155 162 169 176 182 189 196 203 209 216 223 230 236
70 132 139 146 153 160 167 174 181 188 195 202 209 216 222 229 236 243
71 136 143 150 157 165 172 179 186 193 200 208 215 222 229 236 243 250
72 140 147 154 162 169 177 184 191 199 206 213 221 228 235 242 250 258
73 144 151 159 166 174 182 189 197 204 212 219 227 235 242 250 257 265
74 148 155 163 171 179 186 194 202 210 218 225 233 241 249 256 264 272
75 152 160 168 176 184 192 200 208 216 224 232 240 248 256 264 272 279
76 156 164 172 180 189 197 205 213 221 230 238 246 254 263 271 279 287